grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips - LINE OF ACTION
The line of action doesn’t necessarily need to be drawn in. As long as you think about it while drawing, your gesture or posing will be stronger. It gives a direction to the pose, a force that runs though, or simply a visual pathways to guide your audience. Use it always!Norm

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips - LINE OF ACTION

The line of action doesn’t necessarily need to be drawn in. As long as you think about it while drawing, your gesture or posing will be stronger. It gives a direction to the pose, a force that runs though, or simply a visual pathways to guide your audience. Use it always!

Norm

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grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips - TEETH!Always a good tool to have in your “drawing arsenal”. In general, less is more. The less you pay attention to the individual teeth, the better. But, sometimes, a certain character or situation will call upon your knowledge of the pearly whites.-Norm

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips - TEETH!

Always a good tool to have in your “drawing arsenal”. In general, less is more. The less you pay attention to the individual teeth, the better. But, sometimes, a certain character or situation will call upon your knowledge of the pearly whites.

-Norm

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feministsupernatural:

royaltyfashion:

royalwatcher:

this picture is killing me

Everybody trying to help The Queen and then there’s Puttin

Putin doesn’t even try not to look like the villain from a James Bond movie.

feministsupernatural:

royaltyfashion:

royalwatcher:

this picture is killing me

Everybody trying to help The Queen and then there’s Puttin

Putin doesn’t even try not to look like the villain from a James Bond movie.

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125,948 notes

onelazylion:

The Redwall Races - by Chichapie

plunderers, thieves, warlords and murderers

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8,089 notes

dopeybeauty:

aurora is the queen bitch

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409,556 notes

leapinghart:

Wisdom from Sherm Cohen by way of Character Design References!

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36,185 notes

enchantedsleeper:

Alexandre-Gabriel Decamps

enchantedsleeper:

Alexandre-Gabriel Decamps

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34 notes

ancientart:

Rhyton terminating in the forepart of a wild cat. Parthian, ca. 1st century B.C.

Elaborate bowls, animal-headed drinking vessels, and rhytons—vessels which have a hole at the front from which liquid flows—were highly valued in ancient Near Eastern society. During the pre-Achaemenid, Achaemenid, and Parthian periods, examples made of silver, gold, and clay were used throughout a vast area extending both to the east and west of Iran. The animals on these vessels included the ram, horse, bull, ibex, supernatural creatures, and female divinities; some were engraved with royal inscriptions. Rhytons made of precious materials were probably luxury wares used at royal courts. Both the rhyton and the animal-headed vessel were adopted by the Greek world as exotic and prestigious Oriental products.
Dating from the Parthian period, this silver rhyton is a fine example of the enduring influence of Hellenistic culture, which owes much to the artistic traditions of Achaemenid Iran. The horn-shaped vessel ends in the forepart of a panther; a spout for pouring is in the middle of the chest. A gilded fruit-laden grapevine winds around the panther’s chest; at the other end of the rhyton, an ivy wreath encircles the rim. These are the symbols of the Greek wine god Dionysus, whose cult spread eastward with the invasion of Alexander. Dionysiac images—panthers, grapevines, and dancing females—were absorbed by the Parthians and continued to appear in the art of Near Eastern cultures in the Sasanian period (A.D. 224–651). (MET)

Courtesy of & currently located at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, via their online collections, 1979.447.

ancientart:

Rhyton terminating in the forepart of a wild cat. Parthian, ca. 1st century B.C.

Elaborate bowls, animal-headed drinking vessels, and rhytons—vessels which have a hole at the front from which liquid flows—were highly valued in ancient Near Eastern society. During the pre-Achaemenid, Achaemenid, and Parthian periods, examples made of silver, gold, and clay were used throughout a vast area extending both to the east and west of Iran. The animals on these vessels included the ram, horse, bull, ibex, supernatural creatures, and female divinities; some were engraved with royal inscriptions. Rhytons made of precious materials were probably luxury wares used at royal courts. Both the rhyton and the animal-headed vessel were adopted by the Greek world as exotic and prestigious Oriental products.

Dating from the Parthian period, this silver rhyton is a fine example of the enduring influence of Hellenistic culture, which owes much to the artistic traditions of Achaemenid Iran. The horn-shaped vessel ends in the forepart of a panther; a spout for pouring is in the middle of the chest. A gilded fruit-laden grapevine winds around the panther’s chest; at the other end of the rhyton, an ivy wreath encircles the rim. These are the symbols of the Greek wine god Dionysus, whose cult spread eastward with the invasion of Alexander. Dionysiac images—panthers, grapevines, and dancing females—were absorbed by the Parthians and continued to appear in the art of Near Eastern cultures in the Sasanian period (A.D. 224–651). (MET)

Courtesy of & currently located at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, via their online collections1979.447.

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sagrasa:

limitlesscorrosion:

fossilporn:

An Opalised theropod dinosaur tooth, Lightning Ridge, New South Wales, Australia.  Australian Museum, Photographer: Carl Bento

We had a whole plesiosaur dug up in our town in the 70’s, his bones were all solid opal.

Oh man. Where can one see it??

sagrasa:

limitlesscorrosion:

fossilporn:

An Opalised theropod dinosaur tooth, Lightning Ridge, New South Wales, Australia.  Australian Museum, Photographer: Carl Bento

We had a whole plesiosaur dug up in our town in the 70’s, his bones were all solid opal.

Oh man. Where can one see it??

(Source: australianmuseum.net.au, via factualwiley)

1,433 notes

alizena:

#This could be us but you keep calling the police

alizena:

#This could be us but you keep calling the police

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